Pseudo Aesthetics

You know you like it even though you really shouldn't.

colin-vian:

  Bartolomeo Manfredi - Cain Kills Abel, c. 1600, Kunsthistorisches Museum (Vienna)

colin-vian:

  Bartolomeo Manfredi - Cain Kills Abel, c. 1600, Kunsthistorisches Museum (Vienna)

adokal:

The widow Danielis goes to Constantinople to meet with Emperor Basil. Madrid Skylitzes manuscript (9th c. CE).
source

adokal:

The widow Danielis goes to Constantinople to meet with Emperor Basil. Madrid Skylitzes manuscript (9th c. CE).

source

(via massarrah)

colin-vian:

  David Burliuk (1882-1967) Harbor, 1906

colin-vian:

  David Burliuk (1882-1967) Harbor, 1906

thusreluctant:

Vasily Polenov - The Temple of Isis on Philae Island - 1882

thusreluctant:

Vasily PolenovThe Temple of Isis on Philae Island - 1882

(via massarrah)

richard-miles-archaeologist:

Ancient Worlds - BBC Two
Episode 1 “Come Together”

Uruk - “the mother of all cities”.

Uruk was one of the most important cities in ancient Mesopotamia; an ancient city of Sumer -and later Babylonia, situated east of the present bed of the Euphrates river.  According to the Sumerian King List, it was founded by King Enmerkar sometime around 4500 BCE.

Uruk is considered the first true city in the world. It was home to 40.000 or perhaps 50.000 people, a population density unprecedented in human history.

In myth and literature, Uruk was famous as the capital city of Gilgamesh. The great epic poem The Legend of Gilgamesh contains a proud description of his city:

Go up, pace out the walls of Uruk.
Study the foundation terrace and examine the brickwork.
Is not its masonry of kiln - fired brick?
And did not seven masters lay its foundations?
One square mile of city, one square mile of gardens,
One square mile of clay pits, a half square mile of Ishtar’s dwelling,
Three and a half square miles is the measure of Uruk

PART I

Uruk, Iraq

(via lordozner)

beautiful-belgium:

Triptych of Adriaan Reins - Hans Memling (1480). Oil on oak panel, 43,8 x 35,8 cm (central panel), 45,3 x 15,3 cm (each wing) Memlingmuseum, Sint-Janshospitaal, Bruges

beautiful-belgium:

Triptych of Adriaan Reins - Hans Memling (1480). Oil on oak panel, 43,8 x 35,8 cm (central panel), 45,3 x 15,3 cm (each wing) Memlingmuseum, Sint-Janshospitaal, Bruges

(via lordozner)

maertyrer:

Follower of Lazzaro di Jacopo Bastiani - The Burial of Saint George (c. 1495)

maertyrer:

Follower of Lazzaro di Jacopo Bastiani - The Burial of Saint George (c. 1495)

una-lady-italiana:

Todd Walker – Female Nude on High Stand with Window

una-lady-italiana:

Todd Walker – Female Nude on High Stand with Window

jeannepompadour:

Duke John the Fearless of Burgundy receives a book. Frontispice of the “Livre du frère Hayton”, c. 1415

jeannepompadour:

Duke John the Fearless of Burgundy receives a book. Frontispice of the “Livre du frère Hayton”, c. 1415

(via lordozner)

gandalf1202:

Jan Brueghel the Elder - Parish Fair in Schelle [1614] on Flickr.
[Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna - Oil on wood, 52 x 90.5 cm]

gandalf1202:

Jan Brueghel the Elder - Parish Fair in Schelle [1614] on Flickr.

[Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna - Oil on wood, 52 x 90.5 cm]

(via lordozner)

speciesbarocus:

Sassetta - The Blessed Raniero of Borgo San Sepolcro Appearing to a Cardinal in a Dream (1444).

speciesbarocus:

Sassetta - The Blessed Raniero of Borgo San Sepolcro Appearing to a Cardinal in a Dream (1444).

(via lordozner)

colin-vian:

  Gaylord Ho

this name…

colin-vian:

  Gaylord Ho

this name…

gandalf1202:

Ivan Aivazovsky - Constantinople on Flickr.
Ivan Aivazovsky was a famous Russian artist specialising in seascape and landscape portraits. He was born into the family of a destitute Armenian merchant in the Crimean city of Feodosia on July 17, 1817. At the time of Aivazovsky’s birth the city was devastated after a recent war and was still suffering from the consequences of a plague epidemic that had affected the region in 1812.  In 1846 Aivazovsky built his own workshop in his native Feodosia and spent most of his time there, behind closed doors, producing one picture after another. He no longer needed to go outdoors for inspiration - he had already seen so much of his beloved environment that he was able to produce canvases with amazing speed, almost that of a printing machine. By this time the artist has perfected his technique and invented so many tricks that he often astonished his visitors by creating a large canvas in a matter of hours. He died on May 2, 1900 at the age of 82. [Musee des Beaux-Arts de Brest - Oil on canvas]

gandalf1202:

Ivan Aivazovsky - Constantinople on Flickr.

Ivan Aivazovsky was a famous Russian artist specialising in seascape and landscape portraits. He was born into the family of a destitute Armenian merchant in the Crimean city of Feodosia on July 17, 1817. At the time of Aivazovsky’s birth the city was devastated after a recent war and was still suffering from the consequences of a plague epidemic that had affected the region in 1812.

In 1846 Aivazovsky built his own workshop in his native Feodosia and spent most of his time there, behind closed doors, producing one picture after another. He no longer needed to go outdoors for inspiration - he had already seen so much of his beloved environment that he was able to produce canvases with amazing speed, almost that of a printing machine. By this time the artist has perfected his technique and invented so many tricks that he often astonished his visitors by creating a large canvas in a matter of hours. He died on May 2, 1900 at the age of 82.

[Musee des Beaux-Arts de Brest - Oil on canvas]

(via lordozner)

viktor-sbor:

Eglon Hendrik van der Neer - Kandaulus’ Wife Discovering the Hiding Gyges (1660-1662)

viktor-sbor:

Eglon Hendrik van der Neer - Kandaulus’ Wife Discovering the Hiding Gyges (1660-1662)

(via lordozner)

viktor-sbor:

Aert de Gelder - Ahimelech Giving the Sword of Goliath to David [c.1680s]

viktor-sbor:

Aert de Gelder - Ahimelech Giving the Sword of Goliath to David [c.1680s]

(via lordozner)